RxR says : Sorry noobs ^^ IPM

IPM

PCOC’S IPM CERTIFICATION PROGRAM
GreenPro
CLICK HERE FOR SIGN UP

There is a concern with the practice of routinely using pesticides where we study, eat, work, and play as to whether this is the best approach to controlling pests. In 1995, Congress defined integrated pest management as “a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, chemical, cultural, mechanical and physical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health, and environmental risks.”

Pest control in commercial accounts must protect the health and safety of employees, public, and children and minimize damage to structures and personal property, and improve the quality of the environment by avoiding the annoyance or disruption of work and learning that can be caused by insects, rodents, or other pests.

Why Integrated Pest Management (IPM)?
We, as a society, have become increasingly sensitive to our environment; less willing to accept health risks, even very small ones, from contaminants in the food we eat, the water we drink, the air we breathe or in the buildings we occupy.

These concerns are changing the way we live. Pest control, too, is changing with the times. What was common and accepted practice a decade ago is no longer seen as acceptable to many people. A new approach to pest control has evolved. It is called integrated pest management or IPM. It reduces the risks from pesticides and improves the quality of pest control. A concerned public is asking, and sometimes demanding that IPM be used instead of traditional pest control service, particularly in sensitive sites such as schools, hospitals, and restaurants.

Reducing Pesticide Exposure Licensed and unlicensed people are applying pesticides in and around structures, to control unwanted pests such as cockroaches, rats, ants, fleas, and weeds. Despite the reliance on pesticides, however, there are many ways to control pests without the use of chemicals, such as prevention, improved housekeeping, and habitat modification. When a chemical pesticide is warranted, there are numerous effective materials available for the job.

What is IPM? Integrated pest management, or IPM, is a system of controlling pests by combining biological, mechanical, cultural, physical and chemical control methods in a way the minimizes economic, health and environmental risks. Pests are monitored by regular and careful inspections. The inspections identify pests and the conditions contributing to the pest problems. Based on the inspection the technician then decides what actions are necessary. The knowledge of the pest’s biology and habits will help in determining what methods or techniques would best control the pests at the lowest potential exposure possible.

The most important part of IPM is implementation. An effective IPM program must have the cooperation of the customer and their employees. Educating and training the staff about potential pest problems, their causes and the IPM solutions is a very important and simple task. Pesticide training and IPM are intimately linked. Preventing exposure by reducing pesticide use enhances pesticide safety. Simply having informed individuals whom will spot and report pest problems will help manage pests. Meeting the ever-changing state and federal laws, notification requirements, and record keeping is a difficult task.

Integrated Pest Management in Schools

The practice of routinely using pesticides where children study, eat, and play has raised a public concern as to whether this is the best approach to controlling pests in schools. In 1995, Congress defined integrated pest management as “a sustainable approach to managing pests by combining biological, chemical, cultural, mechanical and physical tools in a way that minimizes economic, health, and environmental risks.”

Pest control in schools must protect the health and safety of children and staff, minimize damage to structures and personal property, and improve the quality of the education environment by avoiding the annoyance or disruption of work and learning that can be caused by insects, rodents, or other pests. Pest Control Operators of California recommends that private and public school facilities adopt and implement an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy to control pests in schools.

Why Integrated Pest Management (IPM)?

We, as a society, have become increasingly sensitive to our environment; less willing to accept health risks, even very small ones, from contaminants in the food we eat, the water we drink, the air we breathe or in the buildings we occupy. We are especially sensitive about our children’s health and well being.

These concerns are changing the way we live. Pest control, too, is changing with the times. What was common and accepted practice a decade ago is no longer seen as acceptable to many people. A new approach to pest control has evolved. It is called integrated pest management or IPM. It reduces the risks from pesticides and improves the quality of pest control. A concerned public is asking, and sometimes demanding that IPM be used instead of traditional pest control service, particularly in sensitive sites such as schools.

Reducing Pesticide Exposure

Licensed and unlicensed people are applying pesticides in and around schools, to control unwanted pests such as cockroaches, rats, ants, fleas, and weeds. Despite the reliance on pesticides, however, there are many ways to control pests without the use of chemicals, such as prevention, improved housekeeping, and habitat modification. When a chemical pesticide is warranted, there are numerous effective materials available for the job.

Currently pest control programs in many schools depend on a regular schedule of insecticide treatments, Hallways, restrooms, locker rooms, and cafeterias may be sprayed, fogged, or dusted with insecticides every month. Classrooms and other rooms where pests have been reported may also be treated, even if the pests cannot be found and the source of the pests is not known. Such regular use of insecticides and other pesticides around children, or in areas where children play or study, troubles many parents, and teachers. Pest Control Operators of California recommends using Integrated Pest Management, called IPM for short, to reduce the potential that school children will be exposed to pesticides.

What is IPM?

Integrated pest management, or IPM, is a system of controlling pests by combining biological, mechanical, cultural, physical and chemical control methods in a way the minimizes economic, health and environmental risks. Pests are monitored by regular and careful inspections. The inspections identify pests and the conditions contributing to the pest problems. Based on the inspection the technician then decides what actions are necessary. The knowledge of the pests biology and habits will help in determining what methods or techniques would best control the pests at the lowest potential exposure possible.

Cultural controls: Modifying the activities of the occupants, grounds keepers, and custodians. Examples include restricting food consumption to certain areas or emptying trash cans in the afternoon instead of allowing cans to sit over night.

Physical Controls: Modifying a habitat, using mechanical traps to capture pests, or using barriers or other materials to exclude pests from an area. Examples of habitat modification include caulking, filling access holes in walls, sealing around electrical outlets, or tight fitting trash can lids. Physical traps might include pheromone sticky traps for grain or clothes moths, snap traps for mice, or traps for flies.

Biological Controls: The use of living organisms to control other living organisms. Most pests have natural enemies that control or suppress them effectively in some situations. Some natural enemies or beneficial predators are ladybugs, lacewing, stingless wasps, and nematodes.

Chemical Controls: The use of pesticides in a proper manner and in accordance with the label. Examples of a pesticide application would include applying a dust pesticide into a wall void to control ants or using baits in a crack to control cockroaches.

IPM is just good common sense. Schools that have adopted IPM programs not only report a reduction in their use of pesticides, but a significant improvement in their level of pest control. IPM forces you to look at the big picture and to analyze the problems that caused pest populations to grow in the first place. IPM has proven to be the most effective program. IPM provides effective, long-term control of landscape and structural pests, while protecting the health, environment, and the quality of life of our children, through pest reduction.

A Typical IPM Service Visit

As an IPM technician, you will spend far more time inspecting the school and communicating with school workers. You will be making decisions about what specific control measures to take. You must have a good knowledge of pest, their biology and their habits.
Here is the way a routine service visit might go. First task would be to review the IPM Logbook to see if staff had reported any pest problems, and to review what had been done at the last few service visits. Perhaps you would check in with a staff member to discuss special pest problems or conditions.

Next you would conduct a walkthrough visually inspecting looking for pests and evidence of pest problems, checking sticky traps and other monitoring devices. Record all pest and evidence of pest found in the IPM Logbook. Next you would make a decision about what control tactic to use for each pest problem found. Your recommendation may be nothing for a seasonal pest, to cut back on watering for springtails, to a thorough crack and crevice treatment for roaches. Lastly you would finish making entries in the IPM Logbook, prepare any Sanitation Notices to the school, take care of posting and disclosure requirements, and complete other record keeping requirements.

To be effective, a pest management program has to establish clear lines of communication and designated roles of responsibilities. As an IPM technician working in a school you are far more than simply a pesticide applicator. You are an inspector, an identifier of pests, a communicator, a record keeper, a decision-maker, and a guardian of the well being of students and staff. It is a big responsibility.

Licensing, Education and Notification

The most important part of IPM is implementation. An effective IPM program must have the cooperation of the entire school staff. Educating and training the staff, students, and parents about potential pest problems, their causes and the IPM solutions is a very important and simple task. Pesticide training and IPM are intimately linked. Preventing exposure by reducing pesticide use enhances pesticide safety. Simply having informed individuals who will spot and report pest problems will help manage pests in a school. Meeting the ever-changing state and federal notification requirements, is a difficult task.

Licensing
The pest control specialist must be licensed by the state of California. Any person applying pesticides, other than on their own personal property, must be licensed. An in house pest control specialist must have an appropriate license issued by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation, or the Structural Pest Control Board. A contracted pest control specialist must be have a Branch II Operator, Field Rep, or Applicator license and a Company Registration issued by the State of California

Education
The entire school including teachers, nurses, food service workers, custodial staff, students, and administration need to know the basic concepts of integrated pest management and how they are utilized to control pest problems within schools.

Building maintenance and grounds personnel should understand pest proofing and other steps they can take to keep pest from entering buildings. Housekeeping staff should give special attention to areas with sanitation problems. Food service workers should understand the connection between inadequate sanitation and pests. Students can help by keeping food and beverages in designated areas, removing paper clutter and not placing gum under desks. Staff must leave pest control and pest management to trained professionals, don’t move sticky traps or other monitoring devices, don’t prop open windows or doors, store pet food in tightly sealed containers, keep instructional food items, such as dried beans or macaroni in tightly sealed containers.

The idea is not simply to teach people about pests, but to involve them in the pest management program. The foundation of an effective IPM program is good sanitation. Trash disposal and sound structural maintenance also play important roles in an IPM program. Staff and students must understand how their actions can increase or decrease pest problems in the school. With a combined effort by school administrators, staff, students, parents, and a pest control specialist to incorporate an IPM program, many pest problems can be avoided within the school. By creating an inhospitable environment for the pest, the problems can often be eliminated before they ever occur. Students, parents, and staff should understand that the success of the IPM program is in their own best interest.

Notification and Posting

Schools have different policies on notification. They may require that notices be posted, in advance, at the school entrance, lobby, and area to be treated. Some schools also send notices home to those parents who wish to be informed before pesticide application. A school may have a registry of students and staff who are sensitive to pesticides.

Be prepared to provide additional information on pesticides. Maintain a set of product labels and material safety data sheets for all pesticides used. A copy of each should be on file at the school along with telephone numbers of poison control centers, emergency personnel, and Med-Net. This information should be available to any individual upon request.

The state of California requires posting under TITLE 16 1970.4 and Pesticide Disclosure notification under Department Consumer Affairs – Structural Pest Control Act 8538. These notices are very specific as to the verbiage on the notification and posting. The laws are also precise as to how, when, and where the notification and posting is dealt with.